The book of Psalms: Psalm 8

Fortunately, the first Book of the Psalms is not all gloom and agony. In the Psalm, the Psalmist calls the reader to stop and look up. Although humbled by the magnitude of creation, God’s majesty sustains his person– each person that is made in his image, dignified over all creatures.

The book of Psalms: Psalm 6

With God’s king introduced at the beginning of the book of Psalms, this sixth Psalm shows many of the characteristics of those collected in the first Book 1 of the Psalter. God’s king is seen to cry out to God for help, for vindication and protection, when surrounded by evil, and evil men.

The book of Psalms: Psalm 5

With God’s king introduced at the beginning of the book of Psalms, this fifth Psalm shows many of the characteristics of those collected in the first Book 1 of the Psalter. This is an intensely personal Psalm— one person crying out to God for help in the face of a crisis. It’s written in the first person– king David. David’s experience prepares us for that of God’s ultimate king, Jesus Christ.

The book of Psalms: Psalm 2

The book of Psalms is tied together at significant points by the twin themes of ‘wisdom’ and ‘the king’. The first Psalm was a ‘wisdom’ psalm, pointing out the way of The Blessed. This second Psalm introduces God’s king. He is a king who faces opposition from the rulers of the world. He is a king who invites his enemies to find refuge in him now, while they can. For there is no refuge from God’s ultimate rule, only in it.

The book of Psalms: Psalm 1

The book of Psalms seem to be arranged in some kind of liturgical order— although the exact logic has been lost. There are five divisions or five movements in the collection of 150 Psalms. In this series of daily devotionals, we’re going to immerse ourselves in Book 1— a book in which the Psalmist— very often David— is calling out to God for vindication. Many of these psalms show us God’s person in trouble, depending on God for deliverance, experiencing the tension between God’s sovereignty and their suffering.  We see that God has anointed his chosen king to rule, and yet the king experiences the injustice and the brokenness of this world. The Psalmist’s experience creates an ‘anti-type’ which prepares us for the earthly experience of God’s ultimate King, chosen to bring eternal salvation to God’s people.

2 Kings 21-23

In the biblical narrative of 1 and 2 Kings, as we observe the movement from Monarchy to Exile, from blessing to slavery, God’s people decline further and further away from him. King Josiah of Jerusalem offers a rare moment of light in a dark movement in the history of Israel

1 and 2 Kings: Overview

In the biblical narrative of 1 and 2 Kings, as we observe the movement from Monarchy to Exile, from blessing to slavery, God’s people decline further and further away from him– but we get lost in the complex interplay between the Southern and Northern kingdoms, and the lists of good kings, bad kings and prophets. What’s the big picture? Today’s Daily Devotional tries to help.

Click on this link for a detailed overview of the history of the period of the Kings

1 Kings 17-18: Elijah and Ahab

In the biblical narrative, as we observe the movement from Monarchy to Exile, from blessing to slavery, God’s people decline further and further away from him. Central to Israel’s decline is the interaction between God’s prophets and the Kings, to whom they were sent with God’s word. Even as God sends Elijah to confront King Ahab in 1 Kings 17-18, we observe the hard-heartedness of both the king and their people and we consider how we might defend our own hearts from such decline.

1 Kings 12-13: Jeroboam

In the biblical narrative, as we observe the movement from Monarchy to Exile, from blessing to slavery, God’s people decline further and further away from him. In the case of King Jeroboam of Israel, we see his outrageous attempt to ‘use’ God to fortify his own power. In response, we consider our own ‘use’ of power.

1 Kings 11-12: Rehoboam

In the latter part of King Solomon’s reign, things turn sour as he gives his heart to many foreign wives, and as he mixes his worship of God with the worship of the many foreign gods of his many foreign wives. In the biblical narrative, this begins the movement from Monarchy to Exile, from blessing to slavery. This begins the terrible Decline. And the rule of Rehoboam, Solomon’s son, only serves to accelerate this Decline.

1 Kings 10-11 Pride and Fall

King Solomon receives the throne of David amidst great expectations– what kind of King will he become? Will he live up to the great promises given to David regarding his offspring? Certainly God lives up to his promises as, in 1 Kings 8, Solomon dedicates the Temple in an extensive prayer for mercy and covenant love. But ultimately, Solomon’s heart is compromised and he turns away from God and his ways. The consequences are tragic.

1 Kings 8:22-65 The Prayer of Solomon

King Solomon receives the throne of David amidst great expectations– what kind of King will he become? Will he live up to the great promises given to David regarding his offspring? Certainly, God lives up to his promises as, in 1 Kings 8, Solomon dedicates the Temple in an extensive prayer for mercy and covenant love.